Flood outreach for our members

The flooding devastation across our beautiful state is a pressing concern to the Nebraska State AFL-CIO. Our members have been impacted and we want you to know that we are here to help! We have been collecting information for a Resource Guide which outlines where your members can turn for assistance.  You may access it here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wLT4Yj3n5Qf0i4VJGd_QVPsvayESb8x1L_fz...   We ask that you identify your local members affected by the flooding so that you can connect them to the resources they need.  We have a form you can use when collecting information about your affected members.  Please click here to access the form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8lSXtLba8IHMXBqUmx2T2VkOUdsejB6RENfU0x...   When you complete the form, please copy and share this information with the Nebraska State AFL-CIO so that we can better identify affected members and assist in getting needed resources.  Forms can be mailed to Nebraska State AFL-CIO, 2012 S 13th Street, Lincoln, NE  68502 or emailed to [email protected]

 Unfortunately, the flooding will be continuing for weeks to come. We are hearing that Union members are generous and want to help! There are organized labor projects being finalized to assist in the massive clean-up efforts.  The Omaha Federation of Labor, Lincoln Central Labor Union, Central Nebraska Central Labor Council and the Midwest Central Labor Council will be collecting cleaning supplies over the next several weeks. Supply delivery to affected communities and clean-up assistance projects are being planned via the area Federations, please join your Local Federation with this huge endeavor.

A poster regarding the cleaning supply collection has been distributed. If your Local Union has begun a Disaster Relief project, please share it with us so we can report the good work that you are doing or perhaps enlist others to help. We have had members inquire as to how they can safely donate money to a dependable site. United Way Midlands has set up a Text to Give for flood relief. 100% of every donation to the Nebraska/Iowa Flood Relief Fund will be directed to nonprofit programs meeting people's needs for emergency shelter, food and more. Donors will have the opportunity to direct their gift to a specific community within Nebraska or Iowa. You can text FLOODRELIEF (all caps, no space) to 41444 or visit: https://bit.ly/2CqmEeZ  to donate now.  Donations can also be mailed to United Way Midlands, 2201 Farnam Street, STE 200, Omaha, NE  68102.  Indicate on the check that the donation is for “Nebraska/Iowa Flood Relief.”

Thank you for your assistance during these trying times, together we will be strong for our members and the working families of Nebraska.  We look forward to hearing from you as we collectively go forward.

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