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Tefere Gebre, Executive Vice-President of the AFL-CIO, writes "our democracy suffers not from voter fraud, but voter suppression and disenfranchisement."
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka issued the statement Thursday while negotiators were meeting behind closed doors for a third straight day.
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka gave a major address at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on April 4, 2017. He assessed opportunities around trade and infrastructure that could create jobs, as well as possible threats to workers' rights. President Trumka spoke about the labor movement's strategy to create a unifying agenda for working families, and the importance it places on ensuring that all workers have the right to bargain collectively for better wages and working conditions.

Labor groups have designed a new mobile app to crack down on wage theft and other labor violations faced by immigrant workers. The "Jornaler@" app, from the word jornalero or jornalera, which means day laborer in Spanish, allows workers to report employer abuses.

As this election made clear, a lot of Americans are angry. They feel left behind by the economy, and isolated and unheard in our democracy. Some of this frustration is understandable—wages have hardly budged in decades, inequality is near record levels, and money dominates our political system (and those who don’t have much of it are usually ignored by politicians). That’s a recipe for frustration and alienation, and President-elect Donald Trump seized on it.

On Thursday, Nov. 10, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) addressed the AFL-CIO Executive Council regarding the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka released the following statement on the results of the 2016 presidential election:

Donald Trump has been elected president. America is a democratic nation, and the voters have spoken.

The AFL-CIO accepts the outcome of this election and offers our congratulations to President-elect Trump.

More than anything, this election is an indictment of politics as usual.

Sheet metal worker and 9/11 first responder Joe Rabito takes 14 medications a day so he can breathe. Joe was one of the tens of thousands of first responders in New York City who went out to help survivors of the World Trade Center attacks.

These people, many of them union members, are still feeling the physical and mental long-term health effects from the work they did as first responders. 

This is why the Zadroga Act, which provides permanent health care and compensation to 9/11 survivors and first responders, is so important. 

While Donald Trump continues to excoriate immigrants from South and Central America, the AFL-CIO is ramping up programs to help them unionize and gain political power. A forum recently held in Washington, D.C., highlighted what the labor movement will be doing to provide Latina working women with the tools they need to win better standards of living and security for the future.
Based on exit poll data for the 2012 election, over 70% of African American women voted in the election, 65.6% of white women, 62.6% percent of white men and 61.4% of African American men voted in the same election. “The reason why Black women made the difference is because we bring our entire household to the polls with us” said Carmen Berkley, director of Civil, Human and Woman’s Rights, AFL-CIO. “An investment in Black women is an investment in a number of different people within a particular household.”
AFL-CIO president, Richard Trumka, published a new column on Huffington Post. He writes how Hillary roots for working people and why working people are championing her in tonight's presidential debate.